Learn to say “no”

Perhaps to most empowering thing we can all learn today, is how to say “no”.

Too often we agree to things because we don’t want to offend, or come across as uncooperative.

But even though in the short term you risk offending the other person, in time they will see that you are strong and have your own principles and priorities. And they will learn to respect you.

Say no to friends that are a bad influence.

Say no to partners that want to win while you lose.

Say no to colleagues that take advantage of you by asking you to prioritize their work over your own.

Speak up and tell people what you want. Take back control of your life. Guard your time like it’s the most precious resource you have. Because it is.

How often do we see nice people get taken advantage of because they can’t say no?

5 Leadership Lessons from a First-time Startup Founder

As we look forward to the new year, I have been pondering what are some of the biggest leadership lessons I’ve learned this year. WOBB has gone through significant growth, starting from just me (one person sitting at home in my pyjamas), to a 25 person team, with some of the most talented employees in the business.

I’ve definitely made many mistakes and learned a lot from them, but here are my personal top 5 leadership lessons.

1) The team doesn’t live inside your head

I’ve met founders who said that they were frustrated when the team doesn’t seem to be able to deliver exactly what they’d would hope for. “Sometimes if you want to get something done right, you have to do it yourself.” Admittedly I’ve had this thought myself too.

But what I’ve learned over time is that poor communication from the leader can cause a lot of these problems. When leaders don’t communicate with clear instructions and specific expectations, it causes the team to try to figure out what they think you are looking for, based on that they know, and of course, they are not going to get it right. Because they are not mind readers, they don’t live inside your head.

I always try to remind myself that as the founder of the company, I have access to information from other founders, investors, clients and competitors etc. I’ve been in the company since the beginning, and have clear context of everything that is going on in the company, because every team reports to me.

I can see the full picture. The full picture that individuals in the company do not have access to.

It is therefore our responsibility as leaders who have all the information, to see that your team can’t see everything you see, unless you make that effort to show them clearly what you need, or give them access to the information that will help them. Be clear and specific about your expectations.

Because if you don’t make that effort and just expect them “to know”, it’s your fault that they are not delivering good work, not theirs.

2) Be quick to weed out the “show horse”

(To be kind, I have changed some details of the following story to keep the person anonymous, but the essence of the story is here.)

Jim joined our company full of enthusiasm. Every time I spoke to him, he was incredibility helpful, looks so engaged and was always willing to do everything that I asked. He was also a very bright kid, someone I could ask a question to, and he’ll somehow find an answer.

I really liked Jim, and was thinking of promoting him.

Then one day, someone came to me and started sharing his concern that he caught Jim spending his time watching Youtube during working hours, and sometimes even during meetings, when I’m speaking at the front, he would be watching a video on his laptop instead of paying attention to the meeting.

I was surprised to hear that. There’s no way Jim would do that. Not the enthusiastic Jim that I know.

Then over time, I started hearing other concerns from other people in the company. Uncollaborated, totally independent stories.

“Jim doesn’t go for any client meetings, his calendar is always empty. He spends more time trying to talk to you than get any meaningful work done.”

“Jim is rude to me and doesn’t take feedback well when the team asked him to work harder.”

I started to wonder… wait, is Jim behaving differently in front me because I’m the boss? I paid more attention to his actual work and how he spends his time in the office.

And it turned out to be true. Jim spent most of his energy trying to appear to be doing a great job rather than actually doing it. He had the lowest activities, and delivered the least results. Everything that he touched either stagnated or became worse.

Jim spent most of his energy trying to appear to be doing a great job rather than actually doing it.

It was so easy to be blinded by this “showhorse” had I not made the decision to be unemotional about this and looked at it objectively without any biases.

Suffice to say, Jim didn’t stay long in the company after I started paying more attention to his actual performance rather than appearances.

Remember to watch out for the showhorse.

3) Embrace your “followers” as equals because they make you a leader

As single founder, people always ask me whether it feels lonely not having a co-founder I can share my worries with, or to bounce off ideas. And when I tell them that I can do all these with my core team, it always surprises them that our team is so engaged.

In fact, the team is so passionate about the performance of our business, that I often find them seeking out to do more for the company, seeing problems that worry them and proactively figuring out how to fix these problems, and sharing a lot of the stress that I share as a founder.

But what’s the secret? There no big secret. Just pull them into your world as an equal. As someone that you genuinely value, with opinions that you value, with actions that you trust.

Of course, some of you are now thinking “but not everyone in my team is at the level where I can trust and empower them in such a way”. In which case I would ask you to either:

  • Try anyway, because are you sure you can’t empower them? Or is it because you don’t have the courage to let go?
  • Start thinking about your talent attraction / employer branding strategy so you hire better people

Either way, this video from Derek Sivers reminds me all the time how your followers make you a leader.

4) You dictate the culture of your company

Leaders play a critical role in influencing the culture of their teams. After all, you decide that is acceptable behaviour and what is not. You decide what behaviours get rewarded, and what gets punished.

So if you’re ever in a situation where you’re frustrated that your team is “lazy”, or always late, or don’t openly share their ideas, very often you’ll find that it’s you (the leader) that made the culture what it is.

Whether it’s because of your decisions to hire the wrong people (that ultimately influenced your team’s culture), your inability to publicly reward the right behaviours or punish the wrong ones, or because you do not lead by example, it really all comes down to you to dictate the culture of the company.

Your inability to publicly reward the right behaviours or punish the wrong ones… it all comes down to you to dictate culture

If you don’t want others to be late, then you shouldn’t walk in late just because you’re the boss. If you want your team to share ideas and act proactively, then don’t get annoyed whenever you hear an idea you don’t like (how are they supposed to know what ideas you don’t like, over time they will just learn to speak less).

At WOBB, we even went as far of building our own 9 core values that are specific and actionable to give the team clear guidelines on what is expected behaviour. We obsess about these values, and it’s what drives a lot of our business decisions.

WOBB’s Wall of Values is situated in the middle of the office and takes up an entire wall, as a clear visible reminder to the team about expected behaviour in the company.

5) You should pay more attention to your star players, not less

A common mistake I find many leaders make is that they tend to leave their best people alone, get out of their way. In their mind, if they have a star player that has earned their trust, they should leave their star alone. That’s called “empowerment”.

These leaders then tend to focus their time and energy on their weakest players in their team, which they believe needs “fixing”.

I believe that’s not a great strategy. Because not only will you find that spending time with your weak players doesn’t guarantee they will perform better, you will also soon discover that your star players will also start to get demotivated.

Your star players will soon feel that they are no longer growing in their role, or no longer getting a lot of recognition for their achievements. After all, they are star players, they are always expected to perform and deliver, and over time, it just becomes “normal” and no longer celebrated.

They are no longer coached, because how do you coach someone that is already at the top of their game? And this adds on to your star players feeling stagnated.

I’ve always believed that a better strategy would be to focus your time and energy on your star players instead. These are your best people. They are the most engaged. They have high will. They want to keep growing and they care deeply about their performance and your business.

Give them recognition for their achievements, no matter how many times they keep hitting their goals (that’s a good thing right? Celebrate!). Spend time strategising with them, supporting them, working on making them better.

Paying attention to them is not about you not empowering or trusting them. In fact, very often, high achievers want attention, because that’s what drives them, and it’s a mistake to stop doing that.

And how about coaching? How do you coach someone that is already a star? The real question is – why are you making it so easy for them? They are your star players! Give them bigger tasks, challenge them to do more. Make them uncomfortable.

That is your opportunity to coach them so they keep growing and pushing boundaries. Celebrate whenever they raise their standards. And support them when they need help.

And other people in the company will look to them as examples of how to excel in the company.

In short, investing your time building your best people is a much better long term strategy that will produce a high performance team.

 

employer brand

How to speak to your CEO about employer brand

I’ve attended so many HR events where HR leaders talk about the importance of building a great employer brand, treating your employees right, and about investing in attracting Gen Y. At the end of the event, everyone feels so inspired, people are patting each others’ backs, telling them what great ideas they have, and what an amazing job they are doing.

And then these HR folks go back to the office to share some of these ideas with their CEO and guess what? Their CEO doesn’t care.

To their CEO, all this sounds like HR fluff. “Just try to hire the right person with the least costs”. That’s all the CEO cares about.

So while it’s great we are talking about these things at HR events, it’s important to realise that we don’t want to be in this little bubble that we have created for ourselves, talking about the importance of a good employer brand, when their CEOs are not even listening.

Will your CEO care about employer branding?

So now I am going to attempt to answer a question I get asked most commonly – “How do I get my CEO to care?”

As someone who is running his own business, and also passionate about having great talent, I can share with you some ideas on what your CEO might care about and how you can position employer branding in a way that he or she can relate to.

1) Money

“How does this help us make or save money?”

Let’s face it, it’s easier to get the attention of your CEO if they can relate it directly to whether this helps the company make or save money. So let’s start with money.

Does building a great employer brand help your business make money?

Well, if the nature of your business requires a strong sales and marketing team, then you could say attracting the best talent in sales and marketing helps the company make money. That reasoning, though, may not work for many companies, and may feel like a bit of stretch.

But building a great employer brand would definitely save your business money.

With an attractive employer brand, backed up an aligned recruitment process, companies are able to recruit the right talent, make less hiring mistakes, get better people that fit the culture and ultimately creates an environment that these talents will thrive in. Your staff retention will improve significantly.

What happens when staff retention improves? You’ll spend less time and money on recruitment, less money on headhunters, and less on training and onboarding new employees (not to mention, having less stress and more sleep!).

And the “returns” you get on your employees will improve immensely the longer they stay with you. Employees that stay long will start to have a sense of belonging, become more dedicated, and the momentum they create while being in a job for a long time will mean that they spend less time learning, and more time contributing back to the business.

They spend less time learning, and more time contributing back to the business

2) Competitive advantage

“How does this give us an advantage over our competitors?”

Some companies greatly rely on the quality of their talent to succeed, and creating a company with great culture will give you such a huge competitive edge. This is especially true in these situations:

  1. When you work in an industry where there are only a handful of key competitors. In situations like this, companies aggressively compete with each other for the best talent, and so it makes sense to build a great employer brand to attract the best talent.
  2. If you’re in a service based industry, then there is a direct correlation between the quality of your talent and the service your customers receive. This is also an industry where customers don’t choose companies, they choose the people they want to work with. This includes audit firms, law firms, management consulting firms etc.
  3. If you’re in the creative industry where having the best creative talent helps generate great ideas and is key to your company securing customers and projects.
  4. If you’re in innovation and technology, where your products are intangible and you rely on your talent to design, develop and deploy your products. Having the best people will translate directly to the quality and innovation of your products.
  5. If you’re in a heavily regulated industry with complex products, such as financial services, where you need great talent who understand these products and also keep the company compliant.

In many cases, your CEO may be able to relate to how building the right employer brand to attract great talent will give your company a competitive edge.

3) Organisational transformation

“How do we get our people to be more productive?”

There are also situations where your CEO is frustrated at the productivity of the existing team, and is constantly trying to drive this productivity with the existing workforce, with little results. Some will soon realise that organisational transformation is what is needed, and that will involve rebuilding the team from scratch and hiring the right people, while allowing some of their existing poor performing staff to leave.

For this to succeed, your CEO may realise that having a clear employer brand and building the right culture is the key ingredient as the company goes through this painful but much needed organisational transformation process.

4) Fear of failure

“How do we future-proof our company?”

There are many companies out there who have been in business for many years, had a core group of people that successfully built the business with them. They never used to have talent issues, but for some reason, are noticing that they struggle to attract and retain new younger talent.

And this is a huge concern for some CEOs because they are starting to notice their aging workforce and realise they need fresh talent to keep their company going and that business will fail if they do not solve this problem soon.

This is a huge concern for some CEOs because they start to notice their aging workforce and realise they need fresh talent

Not every CEO can relate to this because they  are just thinking about stability and keeping things as they are. This is clearly a mistake though, as not wanting to change to adapt to the new reality is exactly what will cause the business to fail.

What you can do now

Often, because your CEO may have achieved their success without having to think about talent too much in the past, some may not understand why this is important now.

So I hope this post can help make your job easier, by giving you ideas about the issues that will catch the attention of your CEO, and how you can relate this back to the importance of investing in employer brand, which will ultimately help you attract and retain the best talent.

What to do when there are office politics

Office politics. Too often, people watch others get rewarded due to relationships rather than results, and those that feel they are “real talent” get sidelined because they don’t understand the politics game. It may frustrate you when you feel you or your friends are more deserving of these rewards.

“That guy is such a yes man, always sucking up to the boss.”

“He’s such a politician, never know what he says when talking to management.”

There’s this negative connotation about office politics. If someone is labeled a “politician”, the idea is that this person cannot be trusted. He or she is two-faced. Backstabs. Spends more time on relationships than on actually doing the work.

For people who resent this, they tend to behave in the opposite way, refusing to spend time outside of work with their managers. Believing that the work is enough to get them through. Resenting any form of relationship building with their bosses as a form of “selling out” on their principles. Quietly complaining to their close colleagues about how unfair things are, effectively, making them involved in office politics as well.

Why office politics exist, and it’s not because there are bad people

But the reality is, in large groups of people, office politics will be there and it will matter. How do you get buy-in from the team?

Not everyone necessarily responds to logic. Some value relationships over logic, whether it’s because of their natural personality or because no one is really sure what needs to be done anyway. So feels safer to take care of everyone’s feelings in case something goes wrong, in which case “we all made this decision together”.

People who resent office politics tend refuse to spend time building relationships, seeing it as “selling out” on their principles

People often have to make decisions based on imperfect information, whether they are your manager or colleague. Because of this, their trust levels with different people in the organisation influence how they make decisions, taking into account the interest of the people in their inner circle. It’s less risky when you can get buy in from your inner circle with so much uncertainty.

Understand that this is the reality. Understand that if you want to progress in your organisation, your ability to work with others is important, and many people rely on their feelings rather than logic when it comes to making decisions. Your brand and relationships with others matter.

And I’m talking about achieving a business goal, not a personal selfish goals. Being able to persuade others to make the right decisions and take action is an important skill, and relationships play a role in getting this done.

Wait, so we should have office politics?

Depends on what type of office politics.

People who believe they can get ahead in their careers by using relationships to hurt others are misguided and any competent leader or manager can and should spot this behaviour from a mile away.

Even though I’ve talked about how politics will exist when large groups of people are working together towards a goal, the type of politics that is malicious will damage the company’s culture and affect the company’s ability to make the best decisions.

Passive aggressive personalities that spend more time gossiping within their groups that hurt others. Those that are too afraid to confront, and backstab instead. Or those that focus on trying to get you to do worse, rather than focus on trying to do better themselves to get ahead.

People who believe they can get ahead in their careers by using relationships to hurt others are misguided

When this becomes the prominent culture in the organisation, good talent start to leave, and poor talent start to get rewarded, ultimately leading to businesses failing in the long run.

This is because good talent will soon realise that getting ahead is all about getting the boss to like you (which is what they don’t waste a lot of time on), rather than delivering results (which is what they are good at). They will get frustrated at the type of decisions being made which appear illogical.

So how do we reduce or eliminate politics at work?

The leaders role in managing office politics

This is where good leadership comes in. It takes a strong leader with the will to look pass their own emotions and relationships with others, and instead assess issues objectively using data and logic.

We all know this is not easy, because leaders are human beings too, capable of making mistakes, not having the confidence to damage important relationships, carry the same insecurities as any normal person, and in some cases, got to where they are because of their own relationships rather than actual results.

It take a strong leader with the will to look pass their own emotions and assess issues objectively using data and logic

Having said that, it’s not an excuse to try to judge others based on perception rather than actual results.

If you’re a leader, whenever you feel positively or negatively about someone in the company, stop and look at their actual performance, rather than how they make you feel. Is your feeling justified and is it fair?

Leaders should create a culture of transparency at work

Google is well-known for it’s culture, but employers often brush this off as an expensive luxury, referring mainly to the perks that Google offers employeees (such as free food) rather than looking at what makes their culture great. These often cost nothing.

For example, in the name of transparency, employees at Google are discouraged from complaining about other employees via email. In a popular book “Work Rules!” by Laszlo Bock, Google’s HR Leader, Bock writes about the first time he experienced Google’s commitment to transparency at work:

“The way we solve the ‘backstabbing’ problem, for example, is that if you write a nasty email about someone, you shouldn’t be surprised if they are added to the email thread… I remember the first time I complained about somebody in an email and my manager promptly copied that person, which forced us to quickly resolve the issue. It was a stark lesson in the importance of having direct conversations with colleagues!”

Even when it comes to sharing of information, the company “defaults to openness” by allowing all employees access to information about what is happening at the company.

This is a stark contrast to what most other companies actually practice, which is to share information only as required, keeping most information at the top, and not bothering to explain decisions by just referring it to a decision made by management. If you don’t have all the information, you have no choice but to trust management.

When a leader says “just trust me because you don’t know everything, it’s a management decision”, it creates a culture where leaders become lazy at thinking through their decisions. This lack of objectivity and accountability creates an environment where negative forms of politics will thrive.

When a leader says “just trust me because you don’t know everything, it’s a management decision”, it creates a culture where leaders become lazy at thinking through their decisions.

What we can all do to stop negative office politics

Work hard and deliver results, that’s always the most important thing. Embrace the fact that office politics will exist when large groups of people are working together, just hope it’s not the malicious or negative type.

If you’re leader, and you sense your subordinate prefers spending time building relationships with you rather than on the actual effort of achieving results, remind them always that they will be measured on their results. If a colleague starts to gossip, show them that you are disinterested. Remember, allowing these things to happen on your watch could be just as bad as participating yourself.

And always encourage everyone to be transparent and speak with candor.

If you’re in an environment where you feel people are using politics for the wrong reasons, and your leadership is not doing anything to discourage this, always politely challenge and ask questions. Ask your leaders why certain decisions were made. Keep everyone accountable, regardless whether they are your leader or your colleague, to make objective decisions based on logic rather than emotions.

And if you risk damaging your career because you might upset your boss… well, do you really want to be in an environment like that anyway?

“Whoever you are, or want to be, you may not be interested in politics, but politics is interested in you.”

— Marshall Berman

Radical Candor

Before we jump into how radical candor works, I want to write about the “conventional” or adviced method of giving negative feedback. In my previous jobs, we’ve always been trained to manage communication with colleagues, especially when giving negative feedback, using a common technique where you “sandwich” the negative feedback between positive ones, to get your message across but not hurt egos too much. The idea is that this allows negative feedback to be received without demotivating your team. Continue reading →

How employers can maximise their results from a career fair

Career fairs are one of those events where many employers participate in because it increases visibility of their company to jobseekers, and it’s also a great place to hire many junior or entry level staff, although I’ve known experienced people who were hired through career fairs.

To maximise what you get from a career fair, it all comes down to companies realising this simple fact:

At a career fair, YOU are the face of your company.

Many people you will meet at a career fair may know very little about your company, and for them, you will represent everything they will know about your business. Therefore that impression you leave with them will affect whether they are interested to apply to your company, and this impression will even extend to your business brand.

So with that concept in mind, here are some ideas on how you can maximise your results at a career fair:

1) Select the right employees to man your booth

Because they represent your company, you want to put your best people forward. We recommend diversity, and people who are confident, articulate and friendly. You don’t need to limit these people to just your recruiters or HR division. In fact, if you have non-HR people there, jobseekers can get a better sense of who they will be working with, rather than just relying on your HR team to be the bridge between jobseekers and your business.

Select their background based on what type of jobseekers you expect to find at the career fair. For example, if you are looking to hire technical IT people, have a technical employee with you at the booth.

2) Train them to sell your organisation

How would you want your guys to represent your company? What should they be communicating to jobseekers about your business, your vision, and what’s great about the company? Have a clear consistent message. One of the greatest tools of marketing is to have a consistent message. And you are in the marketing world right now. Here’s an article on how companies like Apple using consistent messages in marketing, and also some techniques which you can use to develop a consistent message for your brand as an employer.

Do note that it’s important to avoid the temptation of the hard sell. Be informative without being imposing or desperate. And before launching into a sales pitch, always ask the jobseekers about them, so you know if it’s relevant. Be easy to talk to. If you hard sell too much, jobseekers will wonder if you are struggling to hire people, which damages your employer brand.

3) Be clear about the positions to focus on

Every employee at the booth should know in detail the positions that you are trying to fill. This makes it easy for them to decide which jobseekers they should focus on, and also linking these jobseekers to actual positions in the company, rather than adopting a generic approach to all conversations.

4) Plan a systematic way to store CVs

You will be getting CVs from three channels: hardcopies, from USB pendrives, and emails. Decide on a system to organise these CVs so you don’t miss out on any later, and you won’t have a headache when you realise the hundreds of CVs are all over the place. Have a box for hardcopies, a dedicated folder on your computer for CVs downloaded from USB pendrives, and maybe even a dedicated email address that jobseekers can send their CVs to later?

Some recruiters prefer to use their own email addresses, as it makes it easy to track who they actually spoke to during the day and its much more personal. This is okay, as long as you know how to organise your own email account in case you do not have time to immediately go through these CVs when you are back in the office.

But this also brings us to next point, which is…

5) Go through the CVs as quickly as you can, after the career fair

Many companies see the career fair as the main event, and once this pool of CVs have been collected, they postpone going through them until a later date when the need to recruit is more urgent.

However, going through these CVs sooner has many advantages, including the fact that you will remember the candidates better, and you know they are actively looking right now, so you won’t waste time calling them a few months later when most of them would have found a job. Also, jobseekers will be impressed at the efficiency of your team, as most companies will probably take a longer time to respond.

6) Make your booth look awesome

I cannot emphasise this enough. Your booth is going to give you personality. It’s the first thing jobseekers see, even before they speak to anyone. The better your booth looks, the more people will pop by to have a conversation. Use bright colours that represent your brand, and make it fun. You can even have demonstrations or props that are relevant to your business.

Here are some other ideas on how you can build a booth that will attract more jobseekers during the career fair.

7) Let jobseekers leave the booth feeling happy they dropped by

Be personable and kind to everyone to comes by the booth. You will come across many jobseekers on the day that you will not hire. But remember to still spend some face time with each person, even if you know that you would never hire them. These people may still be users of your company’s product, whether now or in the future, and they may have friends that you will want to hire, so maintain the best image you can as a respectable company and employer.

Need more ideas about how to sell your company as an employer?

Drop me a line, and I will be happy to give you some input.

 

Is social media really networking?

Networkers and recruiters pay attention, because this really applies to you. Social media is a good networking TOOL, but most people confuse it as being networking itself. There are many social media platforms right now, including Linkedin, Facebook and Twitter. In fact, the other day I got an email from Linkedin asking me to download their “Connected App” because apparently using this I can “network without the work”. Since when did clicking a few buttons and sending a few messages become networking?

Yet that is what a lot of confused people are doing out there right now. They are adding people on these social media platforms, sending them a couple of messages, and in their minds, they are busy NETWORKING. No, not really.

Here’s a little TEDx talk by Michael Goldberg about the Rediscovering Personal Networking, which I believe pretty much sums up what people forget as REAL networking.

Here’s a summary of some of the most important ideas from the talk:

1) Your “friends” on social media are not your real friends

He joked (maybe not a joke) that if you really wanted to know who your real friends are, send them all of the a message telling them that you need help moving to a new house. Only those who respond are your real friends. Everyone else should be “unfriended”.

2) Real relationships are built when networking is about them, not about you

He defined networking as “a proactive approach to meet people to learn with the prospect of helping them”. Not to sell your stuff, or pitch your ideas.

3) It’s okay to network only with people you actually like

Goldberg says that he only likes about a third of the people he meets, and he spends most of his time networking with them.

4) Strategic networking is about technique

Goldberg offers a technique that he summarises as PEEC (Profession, Expertise, Environment, Call to Action). By building a PEEC statement with a clear call to action, you are always prepared when doing strategic networking.

 

 

Why is everyone asking you to “Tell your story?”

Recently I have noticed a bit of a trend when it comes to communication. When I was researching on how to construct a good elevator pitch, I was asked to “Tell your story”.  Want to attract and hire the brightest employees in the market? “Tell your story”. Need to pitch for funding? Yeap, you guessed it, “Tell your story”.

But are people really that interested in my story? I was curious and started to do a little digging, and it turns out that the answer is “Yes”. People are interested to hear your story. But not because they really want to. It’s because biologically the brain has been wired to “switch on” when it realises it’s listening to a story.

I found this article on lifehacker about how our brains react to stories.

Some of my own thoughts on storytelling:

1) Build stories into your presentations or pitches. A presentation with lots of bullet points and too much data is boring and will result in your audience realising that they have an opportunity to catch up on their email.

2) Stories should have an emotional element to really capture someone’s attention. Think movies. Is it a Jurassic Park or Bridget Jones Diary? Think about how these stories are told, you will find many of them follow the same structure (I might write about this more in future).

3) Ultimately you are using the story to convey an idea, so make sure you do have a point at the end of the story, and it’s clear to the people who are listening.

4) Have a sense of humour, if appropriate.

5) Don’t be boring. The brain likes novelty, surprise them throughout the story.

6) Don’t be boring. Seriously.

I really want to point out, that just because you are telling a story, doesn’t automatically mean that your ideas will get through. For anyone who recently watched a film about giant robots, I hope you would agree that there is such a thing as a BAD story!

For now, I will leave you with this TED talk about the typical hero’s journey, and hopefully it will inspire you to tell a good story the next time you have to.

 

The SLOWEST fast food place in Malaysia

On a quiet Saturday night, I decided to visit a fast food place, a place I went to as a child, just to relive some old memories.

When I got there I was very surprised that the queue outside the place was really long, but I decided to wait anyway. There were about 10 customers in front of me, but I thought “hey, it’s a fast food place”, maybe I will wait 10 to 15 mins.

I ended up waiting for more than an ENTIRE HOUR.

How did this happen? I wasn’t sure until I got a bit closer to the counter. There were three counters open, and behind each counter, was one staff. And as I watched them work, it finally dawned on me why the queue was barely moving.

In front of one of the staff were four cups of soft drinks. In order to put the cups onto the tray, he used ONE hand (his right) four times, with his left hand resting by the side. And it was done really slowly, like he really did not want to spill a single drop. I looked around and the other two staff were more or less working like they didn’t care.

Staff walking to the kitchen, disappearing for 30 seconds and coming out with one small box of food. And then walking back into the kitchen again for another box.

Having motivated staff is really really important. Doesn’t matter how good your product is, or how much you spend on marketing, companies need to have a think about the quality of their people who interact with the external world. Because in an age where everyone is trying to bombard consumers with all kinds of advertising (and we obviously start ignoring stuff), its the moments that consumers interact with your people that really leave a lasting impression on your brand.

 

 

 

Lessons on storytelling from David Lian, GM of Zeno

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I attended the DMM360 gathering today, and met David Lian who is the GM of Zeno, an international marketing and communications agency that recently established a presence here in KL.

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He shared really good ideas about what engages your customers, and that storytelling is coming back in a big way. Here is my key takeaway from the session.

The bigger the VILLAIN, the bigger the hero

Using infamous Apple’s 1984 commercial that portrayed IBM as the enemy, David showed that every compelling story will always have a big villain to define who the hero is. The villain does not need to be another company, but it could be about emotions, circumstances or maybe even ourselves. Another example he mentioned was a recent Dove commercial (which I saw for the first time), about how women perceive their own beauty.

Check out Apple’s video here:

Dove’s commercial (if you haven’t seen this, you MUST watch it!):

So when crafting a message to your customers, make sure that they understand WHY you exist, and which villain you are fighting to take down.